November-December 2014 (No. 75)

Editor: Terence K. Huwe
Contributors: Marcy Whitebook, Stefanie Kalmin, Janice Kimball, Jenifer MacGillvary, and Myra Armstrong.

In This Issue:

Especially Recommended
Monday, December 1, 2014 | 12pm - 1pm
Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages: The National Child Care Staffing Study 25 Years Later
Marcy Whitebook

IRLE News and Events
In Memory of Lloyd Ulman
IRLE Colloquium Series
Seth Holmes Receives the 2014 Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association
Recent Working Papers
October 2014 IRLE Web Traffic: Summary Statistics

IRLE Programs
The Labor Center
California Public Employee Relations
Center for the Study of Child Care Employment
Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics
Institute for Research on Labor and Employment Library
Donald Vial Center for Employment in the Green Economy

Campus News and Events
Canadian Studies Program
Economics Department

 

IRLE News and Events


In Memory of of Lloyd Ulman

A service will be held in memory of Lloyd Ulman, noted economist and long-time director of IRLE, on December 15, 2014. The event will begin at 3 pm in the IRLE Library Commons, and will be followed by a reception. This event is by invitation only.

For further information, please contact Myra Armstrong: zulu2@berkeley.edu


IRLE Colloquium Series

All events are held in the Large Conference Room at 2521 Channing Way, unless otherwise noted.
A light lunch is served.

To attend an event, please RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu

Marcy WhitebookMonday, December 1, 2014 | 12pm - 1pm
Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages: The National Child Care Staffing Study 25 Years Later
Marcy Whitebook, Director, Senior Researcher, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE)
Also presenting: Lea J.E. Austin, Fran Kipnis, CSCCE

Presentation of new evidence on the costs of our nation's failure to align expectations and earnings of early childhood teachers examining:

  • Changes in wages, education, and turnover among early education teachers 1989-2013.
  • Economic insecurity among early childhood teachers.
  • Utilization rates and costs of public benefits by early childhood workers and their families.
  • Policy efforts to improve early childhood teaching jobs.


Seth Holmes

Seth Holmes Receives the 2014 Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association

Seth Holmes (School of Public Health) is the 2014 recipient of the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association.  This is the only award given by the entire American Anthropological Association along with the entire Society for Applied Anthropology.  More news of the award may be found on the APA Web site (http://www.aaanet.org/about/prizes-awards/aaa-margaret-mead-award.cfm).

In addition to receiving the Margaret Mead Award, Prof. Holmes’ recent research has attracted widespread interest. During the past year he has received the Out for Sustainability Award (2014; http://out4s.org/fab-planet-honoree-seth-holmes/); The New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology (2013; http://dahsm.ucsf.edu/news/745-2/); Society for the Anthropology of Work Book Award (2013; http://www.aaanet.org/sections/saw/); and the Association for Humanist Sociology Book Award (2014; http://web.ccsu.edu/ahs/files/AHSMidwestFinalPrgrm14.pdf).

IRLE congratulates Seth on the impact of his research.


Report

Recent Working papers

Working papers may be downloaded from:
http://www.irle.berkeley.edu/workingpapers
http://www.escholarship.org/iir

Failure at the top: How power undermines collaborative performance PDF
J. Angus D. Hildreth and Cameron Anderson
Working Paper No. 122-14
November 2014

Using a business function framework to examine outsourcing and offshoring by US organizations PDF
Clair Brown, Timothy Sturgeon, and Julia Lane
Working Paper No. 121-14
June 2014

Talent Flight as a Run on the Firm: A Study of Post-Merger Integration at the Dewey-LeBeouf Law Firm PDF
Ming D. Leung and Hayagreeva Rao
Working Paper No. 120-14
November 2014

From Motherhood Penalties to Husband Premia: The New Challenge for Gender Equality and Family Policy, Lessons from Norway PDF
Trond Petersen, Andrew M. Penner, and Geir Høgsnes
Working Paper No. 119-14
March 2014

Bottle Revolution: Constructing Consumer and Producer Identities in the Craft Beer Industry? PDF
Jo-Ellen Pozner, Michaela DeSoucey, and Katarina Sikavica
Working Paper No. 118-14
October 2014

Why Do Fewer Agricultural Workers Migrate Now? PDF
Maoyong Fan, Susan Gabbard, Anita Alves Pena, and Jeffrey M. Perloff
Working Paper No. 117-14
October 2014

National Labor Movements and Transnational Connections: Global Labor's Evolving Architecture Under Neoliberalism PDF
Peter Evans
Working Paper No. 116-14
September 2014

Why the Federal Reserve Failed to See the Financial Crisis of 2008: The Role of "Macroeconomics" as a Sense making and Cultural Frame PDF
Neil Fligstein, Jonah Stuart Brundage, and Michael Schultz
Working Paper No. 111-14
September 2014

 

IRLE Programs


The Labor Center

New Reports

Environmental and Economic Benefits of Building Solar in California: Quality Careers—Cleaner Lives
By Peter Philips | UC Berkeley Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy | November 10, 2014
Policy and legislative action at both the federal and state levels has stimulated California's recent renewable-energy electricity-generation boom. This report examines the current and potential emissions averted by newly-constructed utility-scale solar farms in California. It calculates the new construction, maintenance and operations jobs created by these recent projects along with the upstream and downstream jobs stimulated by this construction. The report estimates the income, health-insurance and pension benefits of this new utility-scale solar farm construction and subsequent plant operation and maintenance jobs, calculates the training investments made as a result of these projects, estimates the impact of training on lifetime earnings of new workers, and presents case studies of four new apprentice workers employed on these projects. Finally, the report looks at the federal, state, and industry policies that made this solar boom possible and recommends four key policy actions to continue building on California’s leadership in creating high-quality jobs while decarbonizing the energy sector.

The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the Banking Industry
By Sylvia A. Allegretto, Ken Jacobs, Dave Graham-Squire and Megan Emiko Scott | October 27, 2014
A portion of the data and analysis contained in this Policy Brief was previously included in the report The Committee for Better Banks Report: The state of the bank employee on Wall Street, available at www.betterbanks.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Bank-Worker-Campaign-Report-.pdf.

Report highlights

  • Nearly one-third (31 percent) of the families of bank tellers are enrolled in one or more public programs, compared to 25 percent of the workforce as a whole. Bank tellers and their families are more likely than working families in general to be enrolled in public programs.
  • The cost of public benefits to families of bank tellers is nearly $900 million per year.
  • At an average of $534 million per year, spending on Medicaid and CHIP accounts for more than half of these costs.
  • Due to low earnings, bank tellers’ and their families also receive an annual average of $105 million in food stamp benefits and $250 million in EITC payments.
  • More than 110,000 families of bank tellers (24 percent) receive EITC benefits—more than double the number enrolled in any other program. However, the EITC is less expensive than other programs on a household basis, with average benefits of approximately $2,177 per family.
  • The number of families with adults enrolled in Medicaid (43,000) is significantly smaller. But due to significantly higher program costs, Medicaid accounts for more total spending on bank tellers and their families than any other program.

Leadership Development

National Black Worker Center Convening
On Saturday, November 16, the Labor Center hosted the first national convening of the National Black Worker Center Project. Attendees came from Boston, New York City, Washington DC, cities in North Carolina, Memphis, St. Louis, Chicago, Gary, Sacramento, Los Angeles, and various Bay Area cities. They included representatives of existing Black Worker Centers and people interested in organizing centers in their area. The convening focused on developing an analysis of the larger, national political context for organizing, as well as taking steps to coordinate the development and work of black worker centers around the country.

Video

Why Raise the Minimum Wage?
Using research from the UC Berkeley Institute for Research on Labor and Employment and the Economic Policy Institute, this new animated short produced by the Labor Center explains the benefits of raising the nation’s minimum wage for low-wage workers and what impacts it will have on the economy.

Press

San Francisco Wins a Battle in the Fight For $15
Wall St. Cheat Sheet | November 2, 2014

Commentary: The market for local health plans is getting bigger
Zocalo Public Square | November 10, 2014
Part of Zocalo Public Square’s discussion: “Is Local Healthcare Better Healthcare?”

25 ways the uninsured can dodge health care penalty
San Francisco Chronicle | November 7, 2014

Still no clear path for a higher minimum wage
CBS MoneyWatch | November 5, 2014

Data Shows Unemployment Down, Growth Robust After San Jose Adopts $10 Minimum Wage
CBS SF Bay Area | November 4, 2014

In States Voting on Minimum Wage, Even Critics Sound Like Supporters
New York Times | November 3, 2014

Guest commentary: It makes sense to support Measure FF and raise the minimum wage in Oakland
Contra Costa Times | November 1, 2014

Discussion on efforts to raise the minimum wage at the ballot box
KPFA Up Front | October 30, 2014

Minimum wage: For this working mom, it means constantly telling the kids ‘No’
89.3 KPCC Southern California Public Radio | October 29, 2014

Do minority employees in Michigan restaurants face a glass ceiling?
Michigan Radio | October 28, 2014

Restaurants Replace Tipping with 20 Percent Surcharge
KQED Forum | October 27, 2014

Fast Food in Denmark Serves Something Atypical: Living Wages
New York Times | October 27, 2014

The Restaurant Industry Is Rife With Race Discrimination
ThinkProgress | October 24, 2014

Workers group alleges widespread discrimination in restaurants
MSNBC | October 23, 2014

Hiking minimum wage in voters’ hands with Prop. J
San Francisco Examiner | October 16, 2014

Report Claims Over 90% Of Female Restaurant Workers Have Been Sexually Harassed
Business Insider | October 16, 2014

Minimum wage fight moves from Capitol Hill to state and local ballots
Washington Examiner | October 16, 2014

L.A. workers wonder if minimum wage hike will help
Arizona Daily Sun | October 16, 2014

Is the Fast-Food Industry Driving Income Inequality in America?
Wall St. Cheat Sheet | October 15, 2014

‘I’m not on the menu': restaurant workers speak out against harassment
The Guardian | October 15, 2014

Rich and on the dole
New York Daily News | October 14, 2014

Bay Area Cities Set Sights on Raising Their Minimum Wage
Capital & Main | October 14, 2014

New Grants

Blue Shield of California Foundation, Understanding California's Remaining Uninsured


California Public Employee Relations

CPER Pocket GuidesJust published…. Pocket Guide to the Basics of Labor Relations (4th edition, 2014).  If you are a manager who has just been given an assignment that includes labor relations responsibility, or if you are a newly appointed union representative, this Pocket Guide can help you get your bearings and survive the initial stages of what can be a difficult, but rewarding, line of work. The guide offers advice and resources on managing a bargaining team and how best to work with different types of personalities.

In January, CPER will publish a new edition of Pocket Guide to Public Sector Arbitration, a thorough, affordable, and convenient guide for anyone involved in arbitration or factfinding. The guide provides practical information on the process and highlights significant legal issues.

Also in in January, a new title for the education community, Pocket Guide to Dismissal Procedures Affecting Permanent, Certificated Employees.  A.B. 215 takes effect on January 1, 2015. The new law, which governs dismissals and suspensions of permanent certificated employees, achieves the most significant overhaul of the dismissal statutes since 1983. CPER’s Pocket Guide focuses on changes initiated by A.B. 215, and will briefly describe the full reach of the dismissal process, including the unchanged portions.

Recently published:
Pocket Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act (3rd edition, 2014)  
Pocket Guide to the Firefighters’ Procedural Bill of Rights Act (3rd edition, 2014)

Coming this winter:
Pocket Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Acts (5th edition)

All Pocket Guides are described and can be ordered at http://cper.berkeley.edu.


Center for the Study of Child Care Employment

Report Released:  “Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages: The Early Childhood Workforce 25 Years after the National Child Care Staffing Study”
On November 18, 2014 the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California, Berkeley released Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages: The Early Childhood Workforce 25 Years after the National Child Care Staffing Study, at an event hosted by New America in Washington, DC.

In 1989 the National Child Care Staffing Study (NCCSS), authored by CSCCE Director, Marcy Whitebook, Deborah Phillips, Georgetown University, and Carollee Howes, UCLA brought national attention for the first time to the poverty-level wages and high turnover among early childhood teachers, and the adverse consequences for children. In the succeeding quarter century, combined developments in science, practice, and policy have dramatically shifted the context for discussions about the status of early childhood teaching jobs, and the importance of attracting and retaining a well-prepared workforce that is capable of promoting young children’s learning, health and development.

Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages, by the original NCCSS authors, examines trends in early childhood teachers education, wages and turnover, includes new evidence about economic insecurity and use of public income supports among the early childhood workforce, and appraises state and national efforts to improve early childhood teaching jobs.

A section of this report was co-authored by Dave Graham-Squire and Ian Perry of the Labor Center and Sylvia Allegretto of the Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics.

URL:  http://www.irle.berkeley.edu/cscce/2014/report-worthy-work-still-unlivable-wages

Visit New America for the recorded webcast:  http://newamerica.org/education-policy/worthy-work-still-unlivable-wages/

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Webinar
Director Marcy Whitebook and Specialist Lea J.E. Austin, along with Deborah Phillips of Georgetown University, presented findings and recommendations from Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages in a webinar for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on November 20th.

Check the CSCCE website for a link to the webinar.

Early Childhood Community Conversation & Change Lab
Director Marcy Whitebook facilitated a change lab focused on the early childhood workforce at a Berkeley  Community Conversation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the National League of Cities to advance the early childhood agenda and work plan. This event was held on Wednesday, October 29th.

Southern California Public Radio: Preschool teachers among lowest paid, despite degrees
In this article, appearing in Southern California NPR, CSCCE Senior Specialist Fran Kipnis points out that preschool teachers with college degrees have abysmally low salaries in comparison to those in other fields: “Many folks who get a B.A. in early childhood or child development find that their wages are almost one-half of what women in the civilian labor force would be,” she said. Furthermore, as non-traditional students, it is very difficult for teachers to move from an associate degree to a bachelor’s degree. When they do, teachers expect to be appropriately compensated. However, Kipnis explains, this often does not happen, and degreed teachers often leave the early care and education field.

Read and listen more here: http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2014/10/14/17415/preschool-teachers-among-lowest-paid-despite-degre/

CSCCE in the NEWS:  Recent Press
Boston Globe: http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2014/11/17/child-care-workers-wages-stagnate/GqU2aEW2al3EAmcaMhtBAL/story.html

CBS MoneyWatch: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/why-childcare-workers-earn-less-than-dog-trainers/


Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics

Co-Chair Sylvia Allegretto received funding from the Ford Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation to continue her work on the subminimum wage paid to tipped workers.

Co-Chair Allegretto also published on article in the Monthly Labor Review. "Teacher Staffing and Pay Differences: Public and Private Schools."
http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2014/article/teacher-staffing-and-pay-differences-1.htm

Policy Briefs

The Mayor of Los Angeles' Proposed City Minimum Wage Policy: A Prospective Impact Study PDF
Michael Reich, Ken Jacobs, Annette Bernhardt and Ian Perry, September 2014
CWED Brief #2014-05

San Francisco's Proposed City Minimum Wage Law: A Prospective Impact Study PDF
Michael Reich, Ken Jacobs, Annette Bernhardt and Ian Perry, August 2014
CWED Brief #2014-04

Estimated Impact of San Diego's Proposed Minimum Wage Law PDF
Michael Reich, Ken Jacobs, Annette Bernhardt and Ian Perry, June 2014
CWED Brief #2014-03

Ten Dollars or Thirteen Dollars? Comparing the Effects of State Minimum Wage Increases in California PDF
Sylvia A. Allegretto, Michael Reich and Rachel West, June 2014
CWED Brief #2014-02

The Impact of Oakland's Proposed City Minimum Wage Law: A Prospective Study PDF
Michael Reich, Ken Jacobs, Annette Bernhardt and Ian Perry, June 2014
CWED Brief #2014-01

Data and Methods for Estimating the Impact of Proposed Local Minimum Wage Laws PDF
Jeremy Welsh-Loveman, Ian Perry and Annette Bernhardt, June 2014
CWED Techinical Appendix.


Institute for Research on Labor and Employment Library

Data Storage Array Update

The data storage array that was approved in August 2014 has been ordered. It will provide 24 terabytes of new storage space and will support the many new research initiatives underway at IRLE. During November discussions began on the information architecture for this utility, with special attention going to best practices for easy access by multiple project team members.

IRLE Web Site Administration, October 2014

Downloads         Total Hits
1,286,284             2,520,339

Library Web Pages & Visitors: Total Pages: 603    Visitors: 5,944

IRLE Working Papers:   IRLE Hits: 38,998  eScholarship Hits: 2,112

Teamster Scholar Consults IRLE Oral Histories

Seattle-based author Matthew Black traveled to the IRLE Library to consult its one-of-a-kind oral histories of twentieth century labor leaders. He is writing a biography of David Beck, a leading figure in the Teamsters, and was able to find unique accounts that involved Beck’s activities in the oral histories of other union leaders. His book will be distributed to union members once it is complete.

IRLE Librarian Presents Paper in London

IRLE Librarian Terry Huwe presented a paper at Internet Librarian International 2014, which was held in London at the Olympia Conference Center.  The title of his presentation:  “Big Data and the Library: 
A New Role for Info Pros.”


Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy

Press Conference

The Sierra Club and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) held a press event on November 10, 2014 at the IBEW-NECA Zero Net Energy Center in San Leandro to discuss how smart national and statewide clean energy policies have created jobs in California’s solar industry. A White House advisor also attended along with Peter Philips, author of a new report from the Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy which found that California's use of electricity from renewable sources increased from 11 percent in 2008 to nearly 20 percent in 2013. The report, Environmental and Economic Benefits of Building Solar in California, notes that more than 15,000 new jobs have been created over the last five years by California’s solar farm construction boom, with workers building solar arrays earning on average $78,000 a year plus health and other benefits.

Publications

Environmental and Economic Benefits of Building Solar in California
Peter Philips, November 2014

Policy and legislative action at both the federal and state levels has stimulated California's recent renewable-energy electricity-generation boom. This report examines the current and potential emissions averted by newly-constructed utility-scale solar farms in California. It calculates the new construction, maintenance and operations jobs created by these recent projects along with the upstream and downstream jobs stimulated by this construction. The report estimates the income, health-insurance and pension benefits of this new utility-scale solar farm construction and subsequent plant operation and maintenance jobs, calculates the training investments made as a result of these projects, estimates the impact of training on lifetime earnings of new workers, and presents case studies of four new apprentice workers employed on these projects. Finally, the report looks at the federal, state, and industry policies that made this solar boom possible and recommends four key policy actions to continue building on California’s leadership in creating high-quality jobs while decarbonizing the energy sector.

The report is available here:
http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/environmental-and-economic-benefits-of-building-solar-in-california-quality-careers-cleaner-lives/

Presentations

Carol Zabin spoke at the Decarbonizing California: 2020 – 2050 conference in Los Angeles on November 17, 2014 to discuss how the state can meet its ambitious 2050 climate targets while creating good jobs for Californians and growing the economy.

 

Campus News and Events

Canadian Studies Program

December 5, 2014
Berkeley Law School
“Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States”
This symposium brings together scholars interested in the field of law to discuss the achievements and the challenges that continue to face persons with disabilities in their social struggle for equality in each of Canada and the US. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/17481.htm

Economics Department

December 4, 2014
Williamson Seminar on Institutional Analysis
4pm-6pm
C325 Cheit Hall
“Does Transparency Lead to Pay Compression?”, Alex Mas, Princeton University