March 2009 (34)

Editor: Terence K. Huwe
Contributors: Dan Bellm, Stefanie Kalmin, Janice Kimball, Jenifer MacGillvary, Vibhuti Mehra, Dick Walker


Especially Recommended:

Seminar: Vial Center for Employment and the Green Economy
"What is at stake for labor interests in climate policy design –and what can they win at the table?"

Holmes Hummel, Energy Resources Group, visiting specialist on Climate and Energy Policy Design

IRLE News & Events
Spring Colloquium Series
Alex Mas named Sloan Fellow
Recent Sponsored Research
Interdisciplinary Immigration Workshop: Spring 2009 Update
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Volume 48 (No. 1), January 2009
Recent IRLE Working Papers

IRLE Program News

The Labor Center
California Public Employee Relations
California Studies Center
Center for the Study of Child Care Employment
Institute for Research on Labor and Employment Library
The Labor Project for Working Families
Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy

Campus News & Events

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED


Seminar: Vial Center for Employment and the Green Economy
"What is at stake for labor interests in climate policy design –and what can they win at the table?"
Holmes Hummel, Energy Resources Group, visiting specialist on Climate and Energy Policy Design

With 85% of the U.S. energy mix coming from fossil fuels, the Obama Administration's goal of reaching greenhouse gas emissions of 80% below 1990 by 2050 means we are embarking upon a sweeping transformation of the energy sector. California's EPA and Congress are both negotiating rules for a cap-and-trade policy that would establish a price for greenhouse gas pollution, causing unions in energy-intensive industries to raise concerns that a new cost of production might motivate capital flight to other countries, "leaking" emissions along with jobs. Unions representing service workers are concerned about regressive effect of a carbon price on working class households. Climate policy also holds the potential to rapidly creation of millions of new "green jobs" - but there's no guarantee that new energy businesses will welcome union participation. Dr. Hummel will address all three of these issues by clarifying the major concerns, describing the policy options, and making the case for provisions that could best serve the interests of working households in America.

Details:
Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 4-5pm (Note: Date Change)
IRLE Large Conference Room
2521 Channing Way
RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu


IRLE NEWS & EVENTS


Spring 2009 Colloquia & Donald Vial Center Seminars

All events held at:
IRLE Large Conference Room
2521 Channing Way
Light Refreshments Served
RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu

Monday, March 9, 2009 - 12-1pm

Richard Walker

A New New Deal

Richard Walker, Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley (with Gray Brechin)







Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 4-5pm (Note: new date!)

Holmes Hummel

Donald Vial Center Seminar: What is at stake for labor interests in climate policy design –and what can they win at the table?

Holmes Hummel, Energy Resources Group, visiting specialist on Climate and Energy Policy Design

With 85% of the U.S. energy mix coming from fossil fuels, the Obama Administration's goal of reaching greenhouse gas emissions of 80% below 1990 by 2050 means we are embarking upon a sweeping transformation of the energy sector. California's EPA and Congress are both negotiating rules for a cap-and-trade policy that would establish a price for greenhouse gas pollution, causing unions in energy-intensive industries to raise concerns that a new cost of production might motivate capital flight to other countries, "leaking" emissions along with jobs. Unions representing service workers are concerned about regressive effect of a carbon price on working class households. Climate policy also holds the potential to rapidly creation of millions of new "green jobs" - but there's no guarantee that new energy businesses will welcome union participation. Dr. Hummel will address all three of these issues by clarifying the major concerns, describing the policy options, and making the case for provisions that could best serve the interests of working households in America.

Monday, March 16, 2009 - 12-1pm

Paige Skiba

Do Payday Loans Cause Bankruptcy?

Paige Skiba, Vanderbilt University Law School (with Jeremy Tobacman).

An estimated ten million American households borrow on payday loans each year. Despite the prevalence of these loans, little is known about the effects of access to this form of short-term, high-cost credit. We match individual-level administrative records on payday borrowing to public records on bankruptcy, and we exploit a regression discontinuity to estimate the causal impact of access to payday loans on bankruptcy filings. Though payday loans are small (the typical amount is $300), we find that loan approval for first-time applicants increases the two-year bankruptcy filing rate by 2.48 percentage points. There appear to be two components driving this large effect. First, consumers are already financially stressed when they begin borrowing on payday loans. Second, approved applicants borrow repeatedly on payday loans and pawn loans, which carry very high interest rates. For the subsample that identifies our estimates, the cumulative interest burden from payday and pawn loans amounts to roughly 10 percent of the total liquid debt interest burden at the time of bankruptcy filing.

Monday, March 30, 2009 - 12-1pm

John Logan

The Union Avoidance Industry and the Right to Organize in Postwar America

John Logan, Research Specialist, Center for Labor Research and Education, University of California, Berkeley


 


Alex Mas Named 2009 Sloan Fellow

On February 17, 2009, The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation 118 new fellowship awards to early-career scientists, seven of them young faculty researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. IRLE faculty affiliate Alex Mas (Haas School of Business) was one of the seven awardees.

Each Sloan fellow receives $50,000 to pursue whatever research he or she chooses for a period of two years.

"The Sloan Research Fellowships support the work of exceptional young researchers early in their academic careers, and often at pivotal stages in their work," said Paul L. Joskow, president of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, in a press release. "I am proud of the foundation’s rich history in providing the resources and flexibility necessary for young researchers to enhance their scholarship, and I look forward to the future achievements of the 2009 Sloan Research Fellows."

IRLE extends a warm note of congratulations to Alex.

Source: UC Berkeley News Center

 


Recent Sponsored Research

Principal Investigator: Neil Fligstein
Funder: The Tobin Project
Title: "Securitization and the Housing Market"
Summary:
At the core of the Tobin Project is an attempt to investigate how regulation in the past 30 years has been effected by our models of how markets work and our political will, organizational capability, and ideological desire to intervene in markets. The current crisis in the mortgage securitization industry offers great insight into these processes. This proposal argues that one of the main sources of failure has been the lack of a coherent understanding of how these markets came into existence, how tactics and strategies of the principal firms in these markets have evolved over time, and how we ended up with the economic collapse of the main firms. It seeks to provide some insight into these processes by compiling both historical and quantitative data on the emergence and spread of these tactics across the largest investment banks and their principal competitors from the mortgage origination industry.

Principal Investigator and Project Directors: Steven Pitts/Cheryl Brown
Funder: San Francisco Foundation
Title: "Central and East Contra Costa County Labor-Community Green Jobs Project"
Summary:
In order to address gaps between the projected growth in so-called "green jobs" in Contra Costa County and the need for workforce preparedness, new training opportunities, and new ways to address the historic lack of access to quality jobs for low-income residents of the county, especially people of color and youth, the Labor Center will work with the Contra Costa Interfaith Supporting Community Organization to support civic engagement on green jobs in low-income communities of color, especially youth, and will work to bring together labor unions, community-based organizations, workforce development professionals and elected officials to focus on training programs and public policies that can help link low-income residents with the green job market.

Principal Investigator: John Logan
Funder: American Rights at Work
Title: "Employee Free Choice Act Research Gift"

 

Interdisciplinary Immigration Workshop: Spring 2009 Update

About the Workshop:

In September 2003, Professor Irene Bloemraad (Sociology) established the Interdisciplinary Immigration Workshop with funding from the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment. While the Berkeley campus housed numerous individuals with an expertise on immigration and a few area centers with an interest in migrants from a specific region, there was no single forum to bring together scholars of migration and immigrant integration. The Workshop was founded to provide such a venue and to serve as a forum for intense, personalized discussion of members' current research project.

The goals of the workshop are three-fold:

  • To provide an interdisciplinary forum for workshop members to get feedback on their immigration-related research projects
  • To serve as a venue for information dissemination among members
  • To provide a forum for inviting guest speakers to talk about immigration matters to the Berkeley campus and interested community members.

The workshop schedule for the remainder of spring 2009 semester follows below. All interdisciplinary workshop meetings are on Fridays, 1-2:30pm, in 420 Barrows (the sociology department library room, behind the department office), unless otherwise specified.

March 20:

  • Esperanza Sanchez (UCB social work), presenting a paper on transnational social relations (discussant: Laura Lopez Sanders)
  • Rebecca Hamlin (UCB political science), presenting a paper on the response to Chinese asylum seekers in the U.S., Canada, and Australia

April 3:

  • Luisa Farah Schwartzman (Wisconsin sociology), presenting a paper on the categorization of immigrants and their descendants in the U.K. (discussant: Loan Le)
  • Graham Hill (UCB sociology), presenting a paper on the newly created Ministry of Immigration in France (discussant: Rebecca Hamlin)

April 17:

  • Jason Davis (UCB demography, geography), presenting a paper on migrant children’s education in Guatemala (discussant: Esperanza Sanchez)
  • Morris Levy (UCB political science), presenting a paper on Arizona’s employer sanction law (discussant: Ming Chen)

May 8:

  • Laura Lopez Sanders (Stanford sociology), presenting a paper on migrants’ labor market incorporation and churches in the U.S. South (discussant: Jane Cho)
  • Ming Chen (UCB law, JSP), presenting a paper on bilingual education policy in the U.S. (discussant: Morris Levy)

May 15:

  • Paola Suarez (visiting scholar, IGS), presenting a paper on Mexican/Latino organizations in the Bay Area (discussant: Jason Davis)

 

Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Volume 48 (No. 1), January 2009

"Temporary Employment and Strategic Staffing in the Manufacturing Sector"
Matt Vidal and Leann M. Tigges

While prior research has identified different ways of using temporary workers to achieve numerical flexibility, quantitative analysis of temporary employment has been limited to a few key empirical indicators of demand variability that may confound important differences. Our analysis provides evidence that many manufacturers use temporary workers to achieve what we call planned and systematic numerical flexibility, rather than simply in a reactive manner to deal with unexpected problems. Although temporary work may provide many benefits for employers, a key function appears to be the provision of numerical flexibility not to buffer core workers but to externalize certain jobs.

"Who Do Employers Give Discretion? Family Versus Performance Concerns"
Jaime Ortega

Using a large dataset of Western European employees, I examine two sets of reasons behind employers' decisions to give discretion: performance concerns (firms give discretion in order to improve performance) and family concerns (firms wish to improve the employees' work-family balance). I find more support for the former than for the latter. Discretion is positively related to the use of "high-performance" work practices and to employee position and ability, and is smaller in larger establishments, which suggests that loss of control matters to employers. Evidence about family concerns is less compelling. Female participation in the labor force has a positive effect on discretion over work schedules, but women have less discretion than men, and employees with small children do not have more discretion than other employees. Large and governmental organizations, which are expected to care more about work-family balance, do not offer more discretion over work schedules.

"Flexible Daily Work Schedules in US Jobs: Formal Introductions Needed?"
Lonnie Golden

The incidence of flexible daily starting and ending times of work presumably reflects the various underlying motivations of employers to offer them either as a formal workplace program or on a more selective basis. Access to scheduling flexibility is greater for managerial and professional, long hours, private sector, salaried and nonunion jobs, and for parents and males. This advantage is gained primarily through means other than a formal flexitime plan. Implementation of more formal programs would likely promote more equity in access.

"Job Disamenities, Job Satisfaction, Quit Intentions, and Actual Separations: Putting the Pieces Together"
Petri Böckerman and Pekka Ilmakunnas

We analyze the role of adverse working conditions in the determination of employees' quit behavior. Our data contain both detailed information on perceived job disamenities, job satisfaction, and quit intentions from a cross-section survey and information on employees' actual job switches from longitudinal register data that can be linked to the survey. We show that job dissatisfaction that arises in adverse working conditions is related to job search and this in turn is related to actual job switches.

"The Effect of Unionism on Accidents in U.S. Coal Mining, 1897-1929"
William M. Boal

This study estimates the effect of unionism on accident fatalities using two datasets on early twentieth-century coal mining–a state-level dataset and a mine-level dataset. In both datasets, unionism is estimated to have reduced fatalities by about 40 percent. The union effect persists after controlling for state safety regulations, apparently supporting union president John Mitchell's claim that union miners supported each other in refusing to work in unsafe places.

"Family Friendly Practices and Worker Representation in Germany"
John S. Heywood and Uwe Jirjahn

The determinants of three employer-provided family friendly work practices are estimated for German establishments. The presence of a works council stands as a positive determinant of all three practices. When works councils exist in the presence of collective bargaining their influence tends to reflect the demographics of the workplace. The role of the works council becomes larger when the share of women increases and the share of part-timers decreases. We suggest this is consistent with the voice role of works councils.

"Unions and Profits: A Meta-regression analysis"
Hristos Doucouliagos and Patrice Laroche

The effect of unions on profits continues to be an unresolved theoretical and empirical issue. In this paper, clustered data analysis and hierarchical linear meta-regression models are applied to the population of 45 econometric studies that report 532 estimates of the direct effect of unions on profits. Unions have a significant negative effect on profits in the US, and this effect is larger when market based measures of profits are used. Separate meta-regression analyses are used to identify the effects of market power and long lived assets on profits, as well as the sources of union-profit effects. The accumulated evidence rejects market power as a source of union-profit effects. While the case is not yet proven, there is some evidence in support of the appropriation of quasi-rent hypothesis. There is a clear need for further US and non-US primary research in this area.

"Employees' Desire to Join or Leave a Union: Evidence from Poland"
Piotr Zientara and Grzegorz Kuczyński

This research note provides an empirical analysis of the factors related to Polish employees' desire to join and leave a union. Our regression analysis, based on a sample of 298 unionised and 338 non-unionised employees, shows that the desire to join a union is positively associated with career prospects and negatively with company commitment, while the desire to leave a union is positively associated with one's intention to leave the company.

 

Recent IRLE Working Papers

Papers may be downloaded from:
http://www.irle.berkeley.edu/workingpapers
http://repositories.cdlib.org/iir

"The Effect of Industrialization on Children's Education –The Experience of Mexico"
Anne Le Brun, Wellesley College
Susan Helper, Case Western Reserve University
David I. Levine, University of California, Berkeley

ABSTRACT:
We use census data to examine the impact of industrialization on children’s education in Mexico. We find no evidence of reverse causality in this case. We find small positive effects of industrialization on primary education, effects which are larger for domestic manufacturing than for export-intensive assembly (maquiladoras). In contrast, teen-aged girls in Mexican counties (municipios) with more growth in maquiladora employment 1990-2000 have significantly less educational attainment than do girls in low-growth counties. These results shed light on literatures analyzing the impacts of industrialization, foreign investment, and intra-household bargaining power.

"Long-Run Impacts of Unions on Firms: New Evidence from Financial Markets, 1961-1999"
David S. Lee, Princeton University
Alexandre Mas, University of California, Berkeley

ABSTRACT:
We estimate the effect of new unionization on firms" equity value over the 1961-1999 period using a newly assembled sample of National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) representation elections matched to stock market data. Event-study estimates show an average union effect on the equity value of the firm equivalent to a cost of at least $40,500 per unionized worker. At the same time, point estimates from a regression-discontinuity design –comparing the stock market impact of close union election wins to close losses –are considerably maller and close to zero. We find a negative relationship between the cumulative abnormal returns and the vote share in support of the union, allowing us to reconcile these seemingly contradictory findings. Using the magnitudes from the analysis, we calibrate a structural "median voter" model of endogenous union determination in order to conduct counterfactual policy simulations of policies that would marginally increase the ease of unionization.



IRLE PROGRAM NEWS


The Labor Center

Upcoming Trainings

Labor Summer Internship Program
June 15-August 7, 2009

APPLICATIONS FOR BOTH STUDENTS AND HOSTS ARE DUE BY MARCH 2
Applications are now being accepted for host sites the eighth year of one of our most popular programs, the Labor Summer Internship Program. Unions and workers centers host UC undergrads and grads to learn about unions and organizing, and to help with research needs.

New Reports and Publications

"A Tale of Two Tiers: Dividing Workers in the Age of Neoliberalism," by Ken Jacobs, New Labor Forum, Winter 2009 (forthcoming).
An article on two-tier pay and benefit systems. It explores the history of two-tier contracts, examines how the labor movement has responded, and discusses what unions can do to address the challenges that two-tier contracts pose.
Download at: http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/healthcare/jacobs_two_tiers09.pdf
To subscribe to New Labor Forum, please visit www.newlaborforum.org or email newlaborforum@qc.edu.

"Addressing the Employment Impacts of AB 32, California's Global Warming Solutions Act," by Carol Zabin and Andrea Buffa.
This policy brief analyzes the job impacts of AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, and highlights the policy design options that can best promote both lower greenhouse gas emissions and good jobs.
Download at http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/greenjobs/AB32_policy_brief09.pdf

Upcoming Events:

Public Lecture: Wilma Liebman, Chair, National Labor Relations Board
Wednesday, March 4, 2009; 12:45 pm (lunch provided); Boalt Hall, Room 110; UC Berkeley campus. Co-sponsored by the Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law and the UC Berkeley Labor Center. Chairman Liebman has served on the NLRB since November 14, 1997 and became Chair on January 20, 2009. Before joining the Board, she served from 1994 to 1997 at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. She began her legal career as an NLRB staff attorney in 1974, then served on the legal staff of two labor unions: the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (1980-1989) and the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftsmen (1990-1993). For more information about this event, please email bjell@law.berkeley.edu or visit www.bjell.org.

Making Climate Change Policy Work in Difficult Economic Times:
A Conference Focusing on the Job, Employment, and Equity Impacts of Carbon Pricing Policies Tuesday, May 5, 2009; 8:30 AM - 6 PM Conference; 6:30 PM Reception
UC Berkeley International House; 2299 Piedmont Avenue; Berkeley, CA
Carbon pricing policies like cap-and-trade programs are being proposed or implemented to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California, the Western states of the US and Canada, and nationally. This conference will explore the design options within carbon pricing policies that shape impacts on jobs, employment, and equity. Presenters will include leading policy makers, economists, labor leaders, environmental justice advocates, and others.
Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Labor Center, California Labor Federation's Workforce and Economic Development Program, Apollo Alliance, Energy Foundation, Don Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy, and others.
More information soon at http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu
To receive registration information, contact tmshort@berkeley.edu, 510-642-0323.

New Grants:

Open Society Institute: Project on Improving the Quality of Jobs Held by Black Males
To increase the quality of jobs held by Black males by expanding the public debate on the jobs crisis facing Black males; by engaging Black labor leaders in the conversation concerning the job crisis facing Black males; and by developing a Black worker center as a demonstration project.

San Francisco Foundation: Central and East Contra Costa County Labor-Community Green Jobs Project
The Labor Center will work with the Contra Costa Interfaith Supporting Community Organization to support civic engagement on green jobs in low-income communities of color, especially youth, and will work to bring together labor unions, community-based organizations, workforce development professionals and elected officials to focus on training programs and public policies that can help link low-income residents with the green job market.

Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund (renewal): Job Quality Research and Education Initiative
To support the C. L. Dellums African American Union Leadership School and the Labor Center's continuing work with the Consumer Directed Services Network, a model for addressing the workforce crisis for direct support workers for clients with developmental disabilities.

The California Endowment: California Health Policy Research Program
Two-year funding to help build California's health policy research infrastructure and capacity to conduct timely research on issues important to the crafting of state health policy.

Public Welfare Foundation: Research Project on the Union Avoidance Industry and the Subversion of the Right to Organize
The purpose of this project is to examine the impact of employer campaigns on workers' right to organize and bargain collectively in contemporary America through a study of the strategies, tactics, activities and rhetoric of union avoidance consultants.

 


California Public Employee Relations

In order to meet an immediate need by labor organizations that represent public school employees, such as the California School Employees Association, California Teachers Association, and California Federation of Teachers, CPER has recently added two new titles to its Pocket Guide Series:

Pocket Guide to Layoff Rules Affecting Classified Employees
Pocket Guide to Layoff Rules Affecting Certificated Employees

These guides will be available to union representatives and union members at a time when school districts are planning layoffs unprecedented in scope.

CPER is nearing publication of a new edition to its Pocket Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act and its Pocket Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act. A new title is planned for this summer: Pocket Guide to Just Cause.

This month, CPER is cosponsoring the 20th Annual Labor-Management conference presented by the Center for Collaborative Solutions, in Anaheim. Carol Vendrillo will be moderating two panels: one, a public sector labor relations update, the other addressing privacy issues and Internet use in the workplace.

 


California Studies Center

California Studies Conference 2009
Friday, April 24, 2009 - De Anza College
21250 Stevens Creek Blvd, Cupertino, CA - Campus Center Conference Rooms

The Internet floats in the popular imagination like a disembodied utopia; the mecca of Silicon Valley rises out of nowhere, built by technological genius and entrepreneurial drive. In real life, however, these stories obscure more than they reveal. This conference aims to "ground" public discussion about the Internet, Silicon Valley, and high-tech California. The event will bring together scholars, artists, community leaders, and the broader public to explore both the real-world forces that shape these developments and their consequences for people and place. It will also launch a South Bay Studies Working Group for researchers and practitioners engaged in building a deeper understanding of Silicon Valley in order to address its social problems.

The one-day conference will include practical, contextualizing, and critical workshops to examine the idea and place that we call "Silicon Valley."

Featured speakers will include:
Chris Block, American Leadership Forum
Terry Christensen, San Jose State University
Dayana Salazar, SJSU and CommUniverCity
Ian Kim, Ella Baker Center
Sarah Muller, Working Partnerships
Louise Auerhahn, Working Partnerships
Jan English-Lueck
Richard Walker
Raj Jayadev
Glenna Matthews
Mark Linder
Matt Hammer

9:00-5:00 Panel Sessions - $35 suggested donation
Registration begins at 8:30. Price Includes 1 year membership in the California Studies Association.

Track I: Debugging Silicon Valley
A participatory workshop series on the political and social challenges facing Silicon Valley.

Track II: Fragmented Technopolisis: Culture, Identity, Place
Producing cultures, identities, and sense of place in the shadow of high technology.

Track III: Materialitity of the Digitital World
The real world causes and consequences of the internet and high tech development.

6:00 California Studies Dinner at the California History Center - $20
http://californiastudiesassociation.berkeley.edu/

For more details, including information about food and lodging, Contact Tom Izu at the California History Center, izutom@fhda.edu


California Studies Dinner-Seminars

Date: Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Speaker: Fred Turner, Director, Undergraduate Studies; Assistant Professor of Communication, Stanford University, author of From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (2007)

Subject: "Technology and Community in the American Counterculture"

TIME & PLACE
7 :00 p.m. - 10 :00 p.m.
Director's Room, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing St.(just above Telegraph Ave).
The dinner is buffet style. Dinners are free, but we ask for a small donation for those partaking of wine and beverages.

 


Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE)

In this period, CSCCE is particularly focused on working with other advocates and policy makers on best uses for California's federal Economic Recovery funds, which include a sizable investment in early care and education--at the same time that severe cuts to First 5 California's early care and education funds are being proposed.

 


Institute for Research on Labor and Employment Library



Online Access to BNA, Inc. Publications: Update

The Law Library has been expanding its subscriptions to BNA's publications, and they are accessible to all members of the UC Berkeley community. NOTE: that includes anyone who seeks access from the IRLE Library, whether or not they have a campus affiliation.

Relevant offerings now include the Employment Discrimination Report, the Environment Reporter, the Family Law Reporter, and the Health Law Reporter. These join the BNA Labor and Employment Library–the online version of the Labor Relations Reporter. BNA's publications lean heavily toward the legal end of the spectrum, but nonetheless are invaluable research tools for social scientists as well. Take a look at:

http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/online/bna/index.html

IRLE Outreach: Local, National and Beyond

Library staff are compiling an enhanced roster of friends, peer institutions and policy makers. We invite suggestions of names and organizations! Please send suggestions to Janice Kimball, jankim@berkeley.edu


Labor Project for Working Families

For a full listing of LWPF activities check the Web at: http://www.working-families.org/

 


Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy

Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 4-5pm (Note: Date Change)
IRLE Large Conference Room
2521 Channing Way
RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu

"What is at stake for labor interests in climate policy design –and what can they win at the table?"
Holmes Hummel, Energy Resources Group, visiting specialist on Climate and Energy Policy Design

With 85% of the U.S. energy mix coming from fossil fuels, the Obama Administration's goal of reaching greenhouse gas emissions of 80% below 1990 by 2050 means we are embarking upon a sweeping transformation of the energy sector. California's EPA and Congress are both negotiating rules for a cap-and-trade policy that would establish a price for greenhouse gas pollution, causing unions in energy-intensive industries to raise concerns that a new cost of production might motivate capital flight to other countries, "leaking" emissions along with jobs. Unions representing service workers are concerned about regressive effect of a carbon price on working class households. Climate policy also holds the potential to rapidly creation of millions of new "green jobs" - but there's no guarantee that new energy businesses will welcome union participation. Dr. Hummel will address all three of these issues by clarifying the major concerns, describing the policy options, and making the case for provisions that could best serve the interests of working households in America.



CAMPUS EVENTS


Center for Latin American Studies

CLAS Conference Room
2334 Bowditch Street
12:00 –1:15 pm

March 2, 2009
"Why U.S. Foreign Policy Matters: Latino Migration and Political Adaptation in the United States"
Lisa García Bedolla, UC Berkeley

March 9, 2009
"The Political Economy of Mexico–U.S. Migration: A View From the Source Country"
Jorge Bravo, UCLA

 

Economics Department

Economic Department Seminar webpage

Economics 251, Labor Economics Seminar
608-7 Evans Hall
Thursdays
2-4pm

March 5, 2009
"Be as careful of the company you keep as of the books you read. Peer effect in education and on the labor market"
Michele Pellizzari, Visitor

March 12, 2009
"Understanding the City Size Wage Gap"
Nathaniel Baum-Snow, Brown University

 

Demography Department

Bay Area Colloquium in Population

Thursday, March 5, 2009
Moses Hall Conference Room

"The Unexpected Long-Run Impact of the Minimum Wage: An Educational Cascade."

Richard Sutch University of California, Riverside; University of California, Washington Center; National Bureau of Economic Research

Demography Brown Bag Series
2232 Piedmont Ave
Wednesdays
12:10 - 1:00

March 18, 2009
California's Workforce Skills Gap
Deborah Reed, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

April 1, 2009
Calculating Illness and Injury Incidence Rates using Data from California's Workers' Compensation Information System: Methodological Issues.
Henry Hyatt, Economics, UC Berkeley and California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Workers' Compensation