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THE COMPETITIVE SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING HUMAN RESOURCES PROJECT:

Second Interim Report
CSM-32
Clair Brown, Editor


APPENDIX 6-1
Summary of Figures 6-1 to 6-4

Figure 6-1 | Figure 6-2 | Figure 6-3 | Figure 6-4 | Generalizations



FIGURE 6-1. Initial Training

• The number of days of initial training is positively correlated with defect density and direct labor productivity for all three job categories.
• Additionally, there is a positive association between initial training days and line yield for engineers and operators. For operators, cycle time is positively correlated with initial training days.

Figure 6-1. The Correlation Between Initial Training
and The Performance Metrics
       
  Number of Days of Number of Days of Number of Days of
  Operator Orientation Technician Orientation Engineer Orientation
Defect Density positive positive positive
Stepper Throughput      
Line Yield positive   positive
Cycle Time Per Layer positive    
Direct Labor Productivity positive positive positive
 
ïSignificance is at the 10% level.



FIGURE 6-2. Operators

• Using both methods of training in cleanroom procedures and problem solving is positively correlated with the performance metrics.
• On-the-job training or classroom alone is negatively associated with high performance.

Figure 6-2. The Correlation Between Specific Skill Training
and The Performance Metrics
         
OPERATORS Either Method of Training Only On-The-Job Training Only Classroom Training Both Methods Of Training
         
Defect Density F (-)   I (-)  
Stepper Throughput     G (-) H,K (+)
Line Yield F (-)      
Cycle Time Per Layer I (+)   D (-) H,K (+)
Direct Labor Productivity   K (-)   K (+)
 
ïSkill Legend: (A) basic skills, (B) basic science, (C) SPC, (D) company-specific orientation, (E) machine operation, (F) machine maintenance, (G) teamwork/communication, (H) problem solving methods, (I) design of experiments, (J) safety procedures, (K) cleanroom procedures.
ïA '+' means there is a positive correlation. A '-' implies a negative correlation.
ïSignificance is at the 10% level.


FIGURE 6-3. Technicians

• Technicians respond positively to solely classroom training.
• Either classroom or on-the-job training effectively increases the skills of technicians in seven of the eleven categories.
• Both methods of training is positively correlated with high performance for some skills.

Figure 6-3. The Correlation Between Specific Skill Training
and The Performance Metrics
         
TECHNICIANS Either Method of Training Only On-The-Job Training Only Classroom Training Both Methods Of Training
         
Defect Density     H (+) E,F (+)
Stepper Throughput       C,G,H,I,J,K (+)
Line Yield A,D,E,F,H,J,K (+)   A (+) F (+)
Cycle Time Per Layer        
Direct Labor Productivity C,E,F,G,H,J,K (+)     C,G,J,K (+)
 
ïSkill Legend: (A) basic skills, (B) basic science, (C) SPC, (D) company-specific orientation, (E) machine operation,

(F) machine maintenance,, (G) teamwork/communication, (H) problem solving methods, (I) design of experiments, (J) safety procedures, (K) cleanroom procedures.

ïA '+' means there is a positive correlation. A '-' implies a negative correlation.
ïSignificance is at the 10% level.


FIGURE 6-4. Engineers

• Only on-the-job training is ineffective with respect to high performance.
• Only classroom training is mostly negatively correlated with the performance metrics.
• Both methods of training in SPC and cleanroom procedures is correlated with high performance.

Figure 6-4. The Correlation Between Specific Skill Training
and The Performance Metrics
         
ENGINEERS Either Method of Training Only On-The-Job Training Only Classroom Training Both Methods Of Training
         
Defect Density     A (-), H (+)  
Stepper Throughput     C (-) C,G,H,I,L (+)
Line Yield        
Cycle Time Per Layer     D (-)  
Direct Labor Productivity     C (-) C,L (+)
 
ïSkill Legend: (A) basic skills, (B) basic science, (C) SPC, (D) company-specific orientation, (E) machine operation, (F) machine maintenance, (G) teamwork/communication, (H) leadership/supervision, (I) problem solving methods, (J) design of experiments, (K) safety procedures, (L) cleanroom procedures.
ïA '+' means there is a positive correlation. A '-' implies a negative correlation.
ïSignificance is at the 10% level.


Generalizations

• It appears that using OJT training alone isn't useful with respect to increasing performance across all three job categories.
• For operators and engineers, using only classroom training hinders the goal of high performance while it helps technicians.
• There is a positive correlation between the use of both types of training and the performance metrics across all three job categories.
• Training in cleanroom procedures is highly correlated with high performance.

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